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Facebook is changing its News Feed again, and you’ll never guess how!

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Comments (16)
  1. braulio54 says:

    As I look up above this comment, I see:

    “Write emails like a pro with this new app”

    “A forgotten nutrient to help easily lose weight?”

    “Why these 8 alternatives are better than Skype”

    “The most exciting MMORPG you’ve ever played. Don’t miss this!”

    I think this is a lesson cnet needs to learn. These ads are misleading at best most times, and can be completely dishonest at worst.

    If I ran a big ad-supported website, I would forbid misleading ads, ads that flash or blink, any video or animated ad that runs automatically, popups, popunders, and those annoying underlined words in an article that pop up a little ad if you happen to move your pointer over them. This ads are so annoying they have driven me away from a lot of sites, including what used to be one of my favorites: Tom’s Hardware. I can’t go to that site any more.

    At least the ad-blockers do block most of this junk, but they are starting to take money from websites to exclude their ads now, so unless you get the paid ad-blockers you may not like the results.

    To be honest, I would never allow any ads like those on any website I had authority over, and our business website has no ads at all.

  2. Ryder Hayes says:

    And they wonder why we use ad/content blockers.

  3. hank.gerlach says:

    @Mergatroid Mania It literally takes an extra second to read “Sponsored links by [insert company].” The names of the people who place these ads are under the ads themselves! If people are still falling for these types of ads, they must be dumb. 

  4. Wilford Wilkinson says:

    @Daultoninw @Mergatroid Mania The problem with “they must be dumb” is the problem of tech “geniuses” not understanding how stuff works.

    80% of the world that uses tech does not understand why or how they get in trouble by clicking on a link.  They believe tech is safe and the “geniuses” believe everything they produce is safe and very easy to use by everyone.

    The truth is so much of “tech” is sloppy.

  5. Prof. Stacey Turcotte says:

    @Mergatroid Mania You can uncheck the allow some non intrusive advertising and use Adblock element hider helper to get rid of the rest that still show, its great for hiding part of a webpage that you don’t like, not just ads. I also use it to get rid of the trending box on Facebook and the Daily mail where they run loads of celeb links down the side of a news article

  6. beatty.lorenz says:

    As I look up above this comment, I see:

    “Write emails like a pro with this new app”

    “A forgotten nutrient to help easily lose weight?”

    “Why these 8 alternatives are better than Skype”

    “The most exciting MMORPG you’ve ever played. Don’t miss this!”

    I think this is a lesson cnet needs to learn. These ads are misleading at best most times, and can be completely dishonest at worst.

    If I ran a big ad-supported website, I would forbid misleading ads, ads that flash or blink, any video or animated ad that runs automatically, popups, popunders, and those annoying underlined words in an article that pop up a little ad if you happen to move your pointer over them. This ads are so annoying they have driven me away from a lot of sites, including what used to be one of my favorites: Tom’s Hardware. I can’t go to that site any more.

    At least the ad-blockers do block most of this junk, but they are starting to take money from websites to exclude their ads now, so unless you get the paid ad-blockers you may not like the results.

    To be honest, I would never allow any ads like those on any website I had authority over, and our business website has no ads at all.

  7. Mr. Don Predovic II says:

    And they wonder why we use ad/content blockers.

  8. Reina Osinski says:

    @Mergatroid Mania It literally takes an extra second to read “Sponsored links by [insert company].” The names of the people who place these ads are under the ads themselves! If people are still falling for these types of ads, they must be dumb. 

  9. mcdermott.kevin says:

    @Daultoninw @Mergatroid Mania The problem with “they must be dumb” is the problem of tech “geniuses” not understanding how stuff works.

    80% of the world that uses tech does not understand why or how they get in trouble by clicking on a link.  They believe tech is safe and the “geniuses” believe everything they produce is safe and very easy to use by everyone.

    The truth is so much of “tech” is sloppy.

  10. kcollier says:

    @Mergatroid Mania You can uncheck the allow some non intrusive advertising and use Adblock element hider helper to get rid of the rest that still show, its great for hiding part of a webpage that you don’t like, not just ads. I also use it to get rid of the trending box on Facebook and the Daily mail where they run loads of celeb links down the side of a news article

  11. Justice Kiehn says:

    As I look up above this comment, I see:

    “Write emails like a pro with this new app”

    “A forgotten nutrient to help easily lose weight?”

    “Why these 8 alternatives are better than Skype”

    “The most exciting MMORPG you’ve ever played. Don’t miss this!”

    I think this is a lesson cnet needs to learn. These ads are misleading at best most times, and can be completely dishonest at worst.

    If I ran a big ad-supported website, I would forbid misleading ads, ads that flash or blink, any video or animated ad that runs automatically, popups, popunders, and those annoying underlined words in an article that pop up a little ad if you happen to move your pointer over them. This ads are so annoying they have driven me away from a lot of sites, including what used to be one of my favorites: Tom’s Hardware. I can’t go to that site any more.

    At least the ad-blockers do block most of this junk, but they are starting to take money from websites to exclude their ads now, so unless you get the paid ad-blockers you may not like the results.

    To be honest, I would never allow any ads like those on any website I had authority over, and our business website has no ads at all.

  12. dejon.rolfson says:

    @Mergatroid Mania It literally takes an extra second to read “Sponsored links by [insert company].” The names of the people who place these ads are under the ads themselves! If people are still falling for these types of ads, they must be dumb. 

  13. olson.mitchell says:

    @Daultoninw @Mergatroid Mania The problem with “they must be dumb” is the problem of tech “geniuses” not understanding how stuff works.

    80% of the world that uses tech does not understand why or how they get in trouble by clicking on a link.  They believe tech is safe and the “geniuses” believe everything they produce is safe and very easy to use by everyone.

    The truth is so much of “tech” is sloppy.

  14. savannah44 says:

    @Mergatroid Mania You can uncheck the allow some non intrusive advertising and use Adblock element hider helper to get rid of the rest that still show, its great for hiding part of a webpage that you don’t like, not just ads. I also use it to get rid of the trending box on Facebook and the Daily mail where they run loads of celeb links down the side of a news article

  15. ernest90 says:

    @Mergatroid Mania I’d like to think that the costs to run a news website are far lower than the costs to run a business that produces a physical product like a newspaper or magazine, but I’ve never worked in either industry so I don’t know if that’s true. What I do know is that from the very beginning, revenue-generation methods of the two industries has been vastly different. You gotta wonder if your local paper would have survived for as long as it has if it had made revenue-generating deals with devils such as the ones with whom some of these news websites have crawled into bed. One starts to wonder if a pay-to-play web might have been better in the long run if it reduced websites’ dependency on littering their pages with annoying, dynamic ads that potentially put users’ privacy at risk.

  16. Dr. Mark Strosin says:

    And they wonder why we use ad/content blockers.

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